> Commemoration: St. Luke the Evangelist

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Monday October 18, 2021 All Day
Annually on October 18

Saint Luke the Evangelist,

Artist and Companion of Paul

Saint Luke by James Tissot


PRAYER (traditional language):

Almighty God, who didst inspire thy servant Luke the physician To set forth in the Gospel the love and healing power of thy Son: Graciously continue in thy Church the like love and power to heal, to the praise and glory of thy Name; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.


Luke paints the Madonna and the Baby Jesus,

by Maarten van Heemskerck,

1532


 

"Almost all that we know about Luke comes from the New Testament. He was a physician (Col 4:14), a companion of Paul on some of his missionary journeys (Acts 16:10ff; 20:5ff; 27-28). Material found in his Gospel and not elsewhere includes much of the account of Our Lord's birth and infancy and boyhood, some of the most moving parables, such as that of the Good Samaritan and that of the Prodigal Son, and three of the sayings of Christ on the Cross: 'Father, forgive them,' 'Thou shalt be with me in Paradise," and "Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit.'" [1]

 

"In Luke's account of the Gospel, we find an emphasis on the human love of Christ, on His compassion for sinners and for suffering and unhappy persons, for outcasts such as the Samaritans, tax collectors, lepers, shepherds (not a respected profession), and for the poor. The role of women in Christ's ministry is more emphasized in Luke than in the other Gospel writings." [2]

 

"In the book of Acts, we find the early Christian community poised from the start to carry out its commission, confident and aware of Divine guidance. We see how the early Christians at first preached only to Jews, then to Samaritans (a borderline case), then to outright Gentiles like Cornelius, and finally explicitly recognized that Gentiles and Jews are called on equal terms to the service and fellowship of Christ." [3]

 

"Luke makes many casual references throughout his writings (especially in Acts) to local customs and practices, often with demonstrable and noteworthy precision. To mention just one example, he refers to two centurions by name, Cornelius in Acts 10 and Julius in Acts 27, and he calls them both by nomen only, rather than by nomen and cognomen (Sergius Paulus in Acts 13;7) or cognomen only (Gallio in Acts 18:12), as he does when speaking of civilian officials. It is a distinction that would have been routine at the time that Luke is writing about, but one that had largely died out by, say, 70 Ad. His preserving it shows either that (1) he wrote fairly close to the events he described, or (2) he was describing persons and events on which he had good information, or (3) he was an expert historical novelist, with an ear for the authentic-sounding detail." [4]

 

"Luke is commonly thought to be the only non-Jewish New Testament writer. His writings place the life of Christ and the development of the early Church in the larger context of the Roman Empire and society. On the other hand, his writings are focused on Jerusalem and on the Temple. His Gospel begins and ends in the Temple, and chapters nine through nineteen portray Jesus as journeying from Galilee to Jerusalem. Similarly, the Book of Acts describes the Church in Jerusalem (and worshipping in the Temple) and then describes the missionary journeys of Paul as excursions from and returns to Jerusalem." [5]


Miniature of Saint Luke from the Grandes Heures of Anne of Brittany

(1503–1508)

by Jean Bourdichon


"Christian tradition, starting from the 8th century, states that Luke was the first icon painter. He is said to have painted pictures of the Virgin Mary and Child, in particular the Hodegetria image in Constantinople (now lost). Starting from the 11th century, a number of painted images were venerated as his autograph works, including the Black Madonna of Częstochowa and Our Lady of Vladimir. He was also said to have painted Saints Peter and Paul, and to have illustrated a gospel book with a full cycle of miniatures." [6]

 

"Late medieval Guilds of Saint Luke in the cities of Late Medieval Europe, especially Flanders, or the 'Accademia di San Luca' (Academy of Saint Luke) in Rome—imitated in many other European cities during the 16th century—gathered together and protected painters. The tradition that Luke painted icons of Mary and Jesus has been common... The tradition also has support from the Saint Thomas Christians of India who claim to still have one of the Theotokos icons that Saint Luke painted and which Saint Thomas brought to India." [7]


This is a part of a scan of an historical document showing St. Luke:

Title: Schedelsche Weltchronik or Nuremberg Chronicle



Citations:

[1] Kiefer, J. (n.d.). Luke the Evangelist. Retrieved October 06, 2020, from http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bio/271.html

[2] Ibid. 1

[3] Ibid. 1

[4] Ibid. 1

[5] Ibid. 1

[6] Luke the Evangelist. (2020, October 02). Retrieved October 06, 2020, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_the_Evangelist

[7] Ibid. 5

 

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